Shale energy – a global opportunity

GASE provides an international forum for policy makers and industry to leverage the potential of shale gas in a responsible way

Shale energy – a global opportunity

GASE provides an international forum for policy makers and industry to leverage the potential of shale gas in a responsible way

How large are US supplies of shale gas?

The U.S. Department of Energy Information Administration estimates that the U.S. has more than 1,744 trillion cubic feet of technically recoverable natural gas, including 211 trillion cubic feet of proven reserves.

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How large are US supplies of shale gas?

The U.S. Department of Energy Information Administration estimates that the U.S. has more than 1,744 trillion cubic feet of technically recoverable natural gas, including 211 trillion cubic feet of proven reserves.

How large are EU supplies of shale gas?

According to the IEA, there are an estimated 16 tcm of recoverable shale gas reserves in the EU. Shale gas accounts for 76% of all unconventional hydrocarbon reserves.

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How large are EU supplies of shale gas?

According to the IEA, there are an estimated 16 tcm of recoverable shale gas reserves in the EU. Shale gas accounts for 76% of all unconventional hydrocarbon reserves.

GASE attends Senate Committee Hearing on Energy and Natural Resources

Representatives of the Global Alliance for Shale Energy attended a hearing of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, in order to monitor policy developments relevant to responsible shale energy. The committee focused primarily upon reviewing existing legislation, with an eye to repealing outdated regulations.

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Quotes

A general ban on hydraulic fracturing appears on the basis of scientific and technical facts not justifiable. (Prof. Dr. Emmermann, German National Academy of Science and Enginnering)

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GASE Special Newsletter

A current snapshot on shale energy - a changing environment

SHALE ENERGY;  BACKGROUND OF LAST 5 YEARS

Prior to the start of the fracking boom around 2009, geologist have known that large reservoirs of natural gas and oil trapped in shale formations across the United States was an untapped resource that was just too expensive to extract under then current drilling operations.  Horizontal drilling combined with a 40-year old practice of hydraulic fracturing released a cost-effective technique that transformed the industry and launched a drilling expansion in the northern, northeast and southwest regions of the country.  The production results have been even more dramatic.  Shale drilling production helped reduce net imports of energy by over 40% during these years (source: U.S. Energy Information Administration).

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